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Middlesex Hospital

THIS charity was instituted in 1745, for the reception of sick and lame patients, and for the relief of lying-in married women; to supply the indigent and laborious poor of both sexes, with advice, medicine, diet, lodging, and other necessaries, when afflicted with disease, or rendered by accident incapable of supporting themselves and families; and further in 1792, through the munificence of a very humane benefactor, an establishment has been provided for patients afflicted with cancer. Its bye-laws and regulations are of an admirable character ;—they provide for the constant aid and attention of the house-surgeon, &c.; at the same time securing the patients, particularly those in the female wards from too frequent or unnecessary visitations.

The following is a recent monthly statement of patients :—

In-patients admitted by letter.....................63

Ditto accidents.........................................23

..........................................................---- 86

Out-patients by letter..............................141

Ditto accidents.........................................88

..........................................................----229
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.................................................................315
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In-patients discharged..................................9
Ditto remaining in the hospital.....................151

It is under the direction of a patron, a president, 12 vice-presidents, two treasurers, and a committee of the governors, or those who subscribe three guineas annually, or thirty guineas at one payment. The lying-in ward of this hospital has no communication with those in the sick and lame. The patients are visited by three physicians, an accoucheur, and three surgeons, besides the physician and surgeon of the cancer ward. The domestic officers are,—a chaplain, secretary, apothecary, and matron, who reside in the house, have salaries, and are provided with lodging and board. The house-surgeon also resides in the house. A sufficient number of midwives to attend women at their own habitations is provided.

Source: Leigh's New Picture of London. Printed for Samuel Leigh, 18, Strand;
by W. Clowes, Northumberland Court. 1819